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copo_loro_habladorThe Copo National Park is a national park of Argentina, located in the Copo Department, province of Santiago del Estero. It has an area of 1142.5 km². It was created in 1998 in order to preserve a number of endangered species.

The Santiago quebracho is the species here present, typical of the drier areas of that huge biome which occupies all north central Argentina, western Paraguay and a bit of eastern Bolivia. Quebracho has a straight trunk of heavy and extremely hard red wood.
copo_mapaThe "white" quebracho, also found in the park, is much sought for burning charcoal or for firewood.

The effect of cattle grazing has also been a factor in the diminution of the area occupied by these species. Of the 80% of the province's area which was once covered by these woods at the beginning of the XX century, only slightly over 20% remains today, and that has been impoverished by selective logging and grazing.

For this reason Copo is important to National Parks' effort to preserve a good sample of each of the biomes of the country. It also possesses a good population of several threatened species of wildlife such as the jaguar, the giant anteater, the giant armadillo and the chacoan peccary, a species known till recently only from sub-fossil remains but discovered alive and kicking in the seventies.

The turquoise-fronted amazon (a parrot much sought for the pet trade for its excellent capacity to "talk"), here finds refuge and the large trees (with hollows) that it needs for nesting, as does the crowned eagle, and the rhea.
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The park belongs to the Dry Chaco ecosystem. The climate is warm, with annual rainfall between 500 and 700 mm. A large part of it is made up of forest, with the Santiago red quebracho (quebracho colorado santiagueño) being its characteristic tree species. This tree has a strong wood and high content of tannin, and in the past it suffered a devastating exploitation in other parts of the country. At the beginning of the 20th century, Santiago del Estero was 80% quebracho scrubland; nowadays only 20% remain.

Endangered species that live in this park include the maned wolf yaguareté (jaguar), the Giant Anteater, the chacoan peccary, the tatú carreta (a species of armadillo) and a species of parrot.


 
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Tafi del Valle is the most important touristic centre of Tucumán Province.

It is a village sorrounded by mountains, in the mid- west of Tucumán, 107 km away from the capital city.

The name of the village comes from the diaguita word "Taktillakta", that means " Town with a splendid entrance" and the village is an excellent combination of mountains, rivers and climate inviting the tourist in any season of the year. The average temperature in Summer rates 26º C and in Winter rates 16ºC.

It is situated in a deep depression and borders on Calchaquí mountains to the east ( Mala Mala and Tafí Mountains at 3,500 m above the sea level) , on Muñoz Hill ( 4,440 m ) to the west and to the south on Nuñorco Grande at 3,500 m above sea level.

Tafí provides an excellent alternative to enjoy interesting sightseeings and excursions to the high mountains, fresh valleys and springs among fields of fruit-trees.

Van excursions to Los Sasos River , hiking to Pelao Hill , horse- riding to Quilmes ruins or rides by truck in the valley are some of the chosen activities by tourists.

The visitors will find outstanding sites like Nuestra Señora del Carmen Church , la Quebradita narrow pass and La Angostura dam which is an ideal place to fish pejerrey or practice water sports. Apart from that, there are a few archaeological reservations, some of which are almost unexplored.

Thousands of tourists choose Tafí del Valle as a place to spend the Holy Week in order to bring Easter celebration back to life. There is a play called “ The Passion of Tafí del Valle ” which commemorates Christ´s Passion.

Tafí is a charming place to visit, being evidence of its culture and its people´s hospitality.

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The archipelago had only one terrestrial mammal upon the arrival of Europeans, the warrah. This was a kind of fox, and was found on both major islands.

 It was traditionally thought that Patagonian Indians once brought the warrah to the islands as a hunting dog. However, a 2009 DNA study by scientists at UCLA suggested that the warrah arrived on the islands long before humans made it to the New World, and that its nearest relative was the Maned Wolf, an extant South American canid.

 It became extinct in the mid 19th century as human settlement spread.

 14 species of marine mammals including Killer whales, Peale's dolphins, Southern elephant seals, and Southern sea lions frequent the surrounding waters. The elephant seal, the fur seal, and the sea lions all breed on the islands, and the largest elephant seal breeding site has over 500 animals in it. Other species, especially cetaceans, are also sometimes seen.

Five penguins walking up a grassy slope against the wind. 227 bird species have been seen on the islands, over 60 of which are known to breed on the islands. 21 of the resident species are land birds, and 18 are water birds. There are 22 species of seabirds which breed on the islands, and at least 18 annual migrators who breed elsewhere. There are two endemic species of bird, and 14 endemic subspecies.

There are five penguin species breeding on the islands, King penguins, rockhopper penguins, magellanic penguins, gentoo penguins, and macaroni penguins. Approximately 494,500 breeding pairs are thought to live on the island, 500 of which are King penguins.

 Five other species have been recorded, but do not have a breeding population. The largest breeding population of black-browed albatross is found on the islands, making up over 60% of the global black-browed albatross population. This is the only breeding species of albatross, although nine others have been recorded. Many species of Petrel also nest on the falklands. Most remaining bird colonies exist on remote offshore islands.

Inland, upland and ruddy-headed geese live near small freshwater ponds, along with Silver Teal, Chiloe Wigeon, and White-tufted Grebe. There are six species of herons and egrets that have been recorded, although only the black-crowned night heron is known to breed in the area.



    Carabidae.

        Migadopini
            Lissopterus hyadesii falklandicus
            Lissopterus quadrinotatus
            Migadops latus lebruni
            Pseudomigadops falklandicus
            Pseudomigadops fuscus fuscus
            Pseudomigadops fuscus sericeus
            Pseudomigadops handkei handkei
            Pseudomigadops handkei punctatus
   
    Curculionidae.

        Cyclominae
            Antarctobius abditus
            Antarctobius bidentatus
            Antarctobius falklandicus
            Antarctobius malvinensis
            Antarctobius vulsus
            Falklandiellus suffodens
            Falklandius antarcticus
            Falklandius goliath
            Falklandius kuscheli
            Falklandius turbificatus
            Germainiellus salebrosus
            Haversiella albolimbata
            Lanteriella microphtalma [endemic genus/species]
            Puranius championi
            Puranius exculpticollis
            Puranius scaber

 Entiminae.
             Caneorhinus biangulatus
            Cylydrorhinus caudiculatus
            Cylydrorhinus lemniscatus
            Malvinius compressiventris [endemic genus/species]
            Malvinius nordenskioeldi [endemic genus/species]
            Morronia brevirostris [endemic genus/species]
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The Malvinas Islands are an archipelago of two main islands and about 200 islands in the South Atlantic. You are a British overseas territory, located at about 50 degrees south latitude, off the east coast of South America. The islands are from Argentina and claimed in Spanish Islas Malvinas called.

The term “city” can only be for the capital Stanley use, which houses about 2,000 people, about four-fifths of the entire island population. As “villages”, you can normally only call a few places, Port Howard, 120, Goose Green / Darwin together with 70 and Fox Bay East / West with 50 and 4 more with a little more than 35 residents.

The remaining approximately 120 residents living on the islands habitable-divided into “camp-settlements”, (like us to “homestead” or “Hamlet”). The sheep shearing time is here is an exception, then the settlers meet in larger groups, larger even in the villages.

Many animals can be dangerous if they blocked the escape route is, or they have young. Elephant seals and sea lions are the most dangerous – keep a safe distance when you see these animals.

A general rule is that you’re too close, if you notice an animal.

Biogeographically, the Falkland Islands are classified as part of the Antarctic ecozone and Antarctic Floristic Kingdom.

Strong connections exist with the flora and fauna of Patagonia in South America. The only terrestrial mammal upon the arrival of Europeans was the warrah, a kind of fox found on both major islands.

 It became extinct in the mid 19th century. 14 species of marine mammals frequent the surrounding waters. The elephant seal, the fur seal, and the sea lions all breed on the islands, and the largest elephant seal breeding site has over 500 animals in it.

 227 bird species have been seen on the islands, over 60 of which are known to breed on the islands. There are two endemic species of bird, and 14 endemic subspecies.

There are five penguin species breeding on the islands, and over 60% of the global black-browed albatross population also breed in the area.

 
 
 
 
 
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